Taylor Trench

Taylor Trench coat, a PDF sewing pattern from Rebecca Page. Stitched by Jennie

I made a trench coat!!!! If you told me a few years ago that I would make my own coat, I probably would not have believed you. While I have sewn for years, I have really been serious about sewing clothing for myself and my family for about the past year or so. As with anything, if you practice at it, you tend to get better. So, when I saw the beautiful Taylor Trench pattern from Rebecca Page, I knew I had to make one!

Taylor Trench coat, a PDF sewing pattern from Rebecca Page. Stitched by Jennie

The first thing to consider with the Taylor Trench (and really any pattern) is which details you want in your final garment. Here are the options to choose from:

  • long or short length
  • welt or patch pockets
  • shoulder tabs
  • sleeve tabs
  • belt
  • yoke details
  • hood

I decided on the shorter length, and that I wanted to try almost all of the details. I went with welt pockets, both shoulder and sleeve tabs, the belt, hood and the back yoke. The only thing I decided not to do was the shoulder yokes. All of the added details make this coat truly amazing!

Taylor Trench coat, a PDF sewing pattern from Rebecca Page. Stitched by Jennie

Taylor Trench coat, a PDF sewing pattern from Rebecca Page. Stitched by Jennie

There are both sleeve vents and a vent at the back. The sleeve hem was the most difficult part of the pattern for me, fortunately Rebecca has added a video explaining the sleeve hem and vent which explains it so well. Both of these hems are finished by hand sewing them closed, which gives a really professional finish. I might be a little strange, but I really enjoy hand stitching. Sometimes it is nice to step away from the machines and just use a needle and thread. Someday I think it would be really satisfying to make something completely be hand!

Taylor Trench coat, a PDF sewing pattern from Rebecca Page. Stitched by Jennie

Taylor Trench coat, a PDF sewing pattern from Rebecca Page. Stitched by Jennie

Taylor Trench coat, a PDF sewing pattern from Rebecca Page. Stitched by Jennie

The hood is attached with four buttons on the collar, so it can be removed. It is a really nice size, large enough to keep you warm and dry, without being too big.

Taylor Trench coat, a PDF sewing pattern from Rebecca Page. Stitched by Jennie

Here is a close up of some of the great features of the pattern. The welt pockets really add to the look of the coat.

Taylor Trench coat, a PDF sewing pattern from Rebecca Page. Stitched by Jennie

The only modification I made to the pattern, was that I decided to only add one row of buttons down the front of the coat instead of two. I had planned on two rows, however when I was laying them out on my coat, I preferred the look of one row.

Taylor Trench coat, a PDF sewing pattern from Rebecca Page. Stitched by Jennie

The lining is a great place to add some fun fabric. I used some cotton that I found at Jo-Ann’s. For my outer fabric, I used a brushed twill from Fabric.com. The brushed aspect of the fabric makes it really soft.

Taylor Trench coat, a PDF sewing pattern from Rebecca Page. Stitched by Jennie

I am so completely happy with my new Taylor trench coat. Be prepared for this project to take longer than most patterns, but know that it is completely worth it! I am already dreaming of a coat in a fun color, maybe turquoise!

Taylor Trench coat, a PDF sewing pattern from Rebecca Page. Stitched by Jennie

Pattern: Ladies Taylor Trench from Rebecca Page, also available in kids, dolls and a bundle.

Modifications: I only added one row of buttons down the front of the coat, instead of two.

Fabric: Brushed twill from Fabric.com, and cotton lining from Jo-Ann Fabrics.

This post contains affiliate links. Using my links will not cost you anything, but will give me a small percentage of the sale to help me to continue blogging and sharing my sewing adventures.

9 Comments

    1. I definitely want to make more! My husband looked at me like I was crazy when I said I wanted to make a doll version, because he doesn’t understand putting in so much work for doll clothes. It would be so cute to have a matching set for my daughter and her doll though!

  1. This one turned out terrific, and if you do a turquoise one I would LOVE to see it. I adore turquoise and I am planning to have it as an accent feature in my house.

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